Embedded Reading

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Archive for the category “Embedded Readings for ELA/ELL”

“First Words” or “Las Primeras Palabras” by Zach Bryant

Hi,

Here is an embedded reading that I created to go with the video “Las primeras palabras” or “First Words”. 

I wrote the story to go with the irregular yo forms of the present tense in Spanish. I have attached the .doc file as well. I hope it is helpful.

Zach

Here is the document, with the story in several levels WITH activities in English and in Spanish!!!

Zach….thank you SO MUCH!!!

Las Primeras Palabras Cuento

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2015 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

 

 

 

Stories That Can Be Adapted

The following is a story in English which teachers can adapt for any language.  Check it out!:

The boy opened the door

Looking for practice?   Here is a reading in English, which could easily be adapted to another language.  You could use this reading to practice “whittling down” or creating a “Top Down” reading:

My Family

If you would like to share your adaptation, simply email it to lclarcq@yahoo.com

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

A Boy, A Dad and a Swing! Thank you Erin S!!

Here is a great short reading by Erin Slightom.  We will share the English and Spanish versions with you.  It was inspired by a picture!!  It is a fantastic example of building curiosity into the story and utilizing a surprise in the last level of the reading.   She has also done a fantastic job of scaffolding the sentences from the beginning to the end.   If you teach upper levels, just put it in the past tense!!

* We do not yet have permission to publish the picture, but it might be great for the students to illustrate the third version themselves!!

English versions:        The Boy  (Who) Likes to Swing

Version #1

There is a boy in the park.  The boy’s name is Rex.  He is with his dad in the park. His dad’s name is Tom.  He really like the swings.  He wants his dad to push him on the swing.

 

Version #2

It is a beautiful day.  A boy and his dad are in the park.   The boy really likes the park.  The boy’s name is Rex.  He is with his dad in the park. The boy’s dad’s name is Tom.

Rex really like the swings.  The boy needs a push on the swing. He wants his dad to push him on the swing.

The dad wants to push his son on the swing.  But, the dad is very frustrated.  It is impossible to push the swing.

 

Version #3

It’s Saturday, a beautiful day.  A boy and his dad are in the park.  The boy is excited.  He really likes the park.  He really likes to be in the park with his dad.  This boy’s name is Rex.  The father of the boy is named Tom

Rex really likes the swings. The boy needs a push on the swing.  He wants his dad to push him on the swing.  The dad wants to push his son on the swing.  But the dad is very frustrated.  The dad is not a normal dad.  Tom is not a person, he’s a Tyrannasaurus.    A Tyrannasaurus cannot push the swing.  The dad’s arms are very short and his head is very big.  It’s impossible to push the swing for his son.

 

A Un Niño Le Gusta El Columpio

Version #1

Hay un niño en el parque.  El niño se llama Rex.  Está con su papá en el parque.  Su papá se llama Tom.

Le gusta mucho el columpio.  Quiere que su papá le empuje en el columpio.

 

Version #2

Es un día muy bonito. Un niño y su papá están en el parque.    Al niño le gusta mucho el parque.  Este niño se llama Rex.  El papá del  niño se llama Tom.

A Rex le gustan mucho los columpios.  El niño necesita un empuje en el columpio.  Quiere que su papá le empuje en el columpio.

El papá quiere empujar a su hijo en el columpio.  Pero el papá está muy frustrado.  Es imposible empujar el columpio.

 

Version #3

Es el sábado, un día muy bonito. Un niño y su papá están en el parque.   El niño está emocionado.  Le gusta mucho el parque.  Le gusta mucho estar en el parque con su papá.  Este niño se llama Rex.  El papá del  niño se llama Tom.

 

A Rex le gustan mucho los columpios.  El niño necesita un empuje en el columpio.  Quiere que su papá le empuje en el columpio.

El papá quiere empujar a su hijo en el columpio.  Pero el papá está muy frustrado.  El papá no es un papá normal.  Tom  no es una persona, es un Tiranosaurio.  El tiranosaurio no puede empujar el columpio.  Los brazos del papá son muy cortos y la cabeza es muy grande.  Es imposible empujar el columpio para su hijo.

Lord of the Flies: Chapter 7

Below are a series of versions of Chapter 7 of the novel Lord of the Flies.  The base reading and versions 2 and 3 also include activities that align with the readings.   Version 4 and the original do not.   If it’s been a while since you’ve read the novel, a peek at this chapter might entice you to pick it back up again!!

 

Lord of the Flies Chap 7 Base reading and questions

 

Lord of the Flies Chap 7 Version 2 and activities

 

Lord of the Flies Chap 7 Version 3 and activities

 

Lord of the Flies Chap 7 Version 4

 

Lord of the Flies Chap 7 Original

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

Careers in Science:ER in English

Below is a reading, in English, about an interesting  career in veterinary science.  There are no activities at this time, but feel free to send them along if you use this piece!!  It is  great reading to work on for a non-fiction piece in English.

 

What is a Veterinary Behaviorist?

 

 

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

Every Day….in conjunction with Film English

In my travels today, I came across this wonderful site by Kieran Donaghy  :  Film English.  It is a wonderful companion to Movie Talk!

The following is an Embedded Reading to go along with this May 11, 2013 post:

(Spoiler alert!  The last line is important and about 45 seconds before the end the woman appears in a bra…preview before using with non-adult classes)

It’s a lovely piece, and very timely for us at this time of year.  The video, and the reading are in English.   It could absolutely be done without sound and by translating the reading below.

The video, in English, is actually a very cool conversation between a man and a woman.  The reading is directed to the viewer and is directly correlated, using most of the same vocabulary and structures.  It is a bit different than the narration-type readings posted in the past.    See what you think!

Base reading

Imagine……one extra day.   Think about it.  What would you do?

Would you sleep in?

Would you go to the gym?

Would you visit someone?

Would you get things done?

Would you read a book?

Would you sit in the tub?

Would you talk to people?

Would you straighten out your life?

Would you share it with friends?

What would you call this EXTRA day?

Version 2

Imagine that there is one extra day in the week, without responsibilities.   Think about the possibilities.   Would you travel?  You would just have a day.

Would you just sleep in late?   Would you spend time at the gym?  Would you visit someone you don’t get to see?

Would you work and get things done?   Would you curl up with a book?  Would you spend some time in the tub?

Would you tell more people that you like them?  Would you use the time to straighten out your life a bit?

Would it take you a day to decide how to use it?  Would you share it with some friends?

What would you call it?  A name that captures the potential?   Would you just call it the EXTRA day?

Version 3

Imagine that there is one extra day in the week.   Think about the possibilities.  One extra day, without responsibilities?  Would you travel?  It couldn’t be far.  You would only have one day.

Would you just sleep in late and enjoy it?   (Or would that be a waste?)  Would you spend a little extra time at the gym?  ( Do you even like the gym? ) Would you visit someone you care about, but don’t often get to see?

Would you work a few hours and get everything done?   Would you curl up with a book that you love?  Would you spend some time in the tub?

What would you pay more attention to?  Would you take the time to tell more people that you like them?  Would you use the time to get organized and straighten out your life a bit?

Or would it take you the entire day to decide how to use it?  Would you drink a little wine, maybe share it with some friends?

If you had this day…would you want it to have a special name?  A name that captures all of the potential?   Would you call it the EXTRA day?  Or maybe the SPECIAL day?

Version 4

Imagine that there is one extra day in the week.   Think about the possibilities.  One extra day, without responsibilities.  Would you be able to travel?  It couldn’t be far.  You would only have one day.

Would you just sleep in late and enjoy it?  (Or would that be a waste?)  Would you spend time at the gym?   (Do you even like the gym enough to do that?)  Would you visit someone you care about, but don’t often get to see?  Would only one day be enough?

Would you work a few extra hours and for once, get everything done?   Would you curl up with a book that you love, or perhaps one that you haven’t yet read?  Would you spend some time in the tub?

What would you pay more attention to?  Would you take the time to tell more people that you like them?  (Or would that just be weird? ) Would you use the time to get organized, fix things and straighten out your life a bit?  Or would you want to do something better on this extra day?

Or would it take you the entire extra day to decide how you would use it?  Would you find time to taste delicious wine, maybe share it, the wine and the day, with some special friends?

If you had this day, if it existed…what would you call it?   Would you want it to have a special name?  A name that captures all of the potential?  All of the possibilities?  Would you call it the EXTRA day?  Or maybe the UNIQUE day?  What about the SPECIAL day?

Then again…why not just call it….EVERYDAY?

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

“Best Idea Ever” English version

Here is the English version.  Thanks again Tana Krohn for sharing your work and your ideas!  (look for her ideas after the readings!)

English #1:

There is a man. His name is Sir Newton. Sir Newton is under a tree. An apple falls on his head. Sir Newton studies the apple. He studies more apples. He has an idea.

Sir Newton makes pies with the apples. He wants to sell the pies. No one wants the pies. Sir Newton is sad.

There is a bird. The bird poops on Sir Newton. Sir Newton has another idea!

English #2:

In a town there is a man. His name is Sir Newton. Sir Newton is under a tree. He is under a tree when an apple falls on his head. Sir Newton looks at the apple. He looks at the tree. He looks at the apple. He looks at the tree. He looks at the apple and throws it in the air. He studies more apples… and has an idea! He runs to the town with a lot of apples.

Sir Newton makes a lot of pies with the apples. He wants to sell the pies. No onw wants the apple pies. Sir Newton is sad. He throws an pie on the ground. Suddenly, a bird poops on his head. He looks at the bird…. and has another idea!

English #3:

 

There is a town where the weather is good. It’s sunny and cool. It’s fall. In the town there is a man. His name is Sir Newton. Sir Newton is tall and thin and has white hair (truly he has a white wig).

Sir Newton is under a tree. He has a telescope and five books. He is under a tree when an apple falls on his head. Sir Newton is confused. He looks at the apple. He looks at the tree. He looks at the apple. He looks at the tree. He takes the apple ant throws it in the air. He studies more apples. He eats the apple… and has an idea! He runs to the town with a lot of apples.

Sir Newton makes apple pies! He likes apple pies. He makes a lot because he wants to sell the pies. Unfortunately, no one wants the apple pies. Sir Newton is sad. He throws a pie on the ground.

Suddenly, a bird poops on his head. Sir Newton is confused. He looks at the bird… and has another idea! He makes wings in order to fly!

This tied in nicely with the kids’ current physics unit!
In addition to the readings, I also had students complete some of the following activities:
1)  Add their own details to the story based on known vocabulary:  weather, season, colors, physical/personality descriptions of characters, etc.
2)  Write their own True/False statements about the story.
3)  Give them a pre-quiz and “quiz” on the story based on their own true/false statements.
4)  Illustrate a scene from the story. Have the kids exchange drawings and write the a sentence about someone else’s drawing. I had other activities I wanted to do around these drawings…. Have students walk around the room and write sentences about multiple drawings of their choice (each drawing has a number and students write down the numbers of the drawings that hey write about). There is also a fun activity that involves drawing a picture and passing it to the next person who has to write a sentence about the drawing. Then you fold the first drawing down and have the third person illustrate the second person’s sentence. I’ve this at parties, but haven’t tried it in class yet.
Much of the vocabulary in this story (included and omitted) was obviously based on what I know my students know. You will definitely want to tailor it to your own students’ needs!

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

Embedded Reading in English: SS Common Core

Below is an Embedded Reading in English designed for middle school Social Studies classes.   The activities have not yet been designed, but we’ll add them when they are!!

evolution of grocery bag   (credit:  EngageNY.com)

Here are the base reading and final readings:  Click on the link above to read all of the versions.

Base reading:

Petroski, Henry. “The Evolution of the Grocery Bag.” American Scholar 72.4 (Autumn 2003). (2003)

The supermarket checkout would be even more frustrating were it not for the square-bottomed paper bag.  How paper bags are made is fascinating.  However, there is no such thing as a perfect object. The inventers of the world love to improve things, even bags.

Original version:

Petroski, Henry. “The Evolution of the Grocery Bag.” American Scholar 72.4 (Autumn 2003). (2003)

 

That much-reviled bottleneck known as the American supermarket checkout lane would be an even greater exercise in frustration were it not for several technological advances. The Universal Product Code and the decoding laser scanner, introduced in 1974, tally a shopper’s groceries far more quickly and accurately than the old method of inputting each purchase manually into a cash register. But beeping a large order past the scanner would have led only to a faster pileup of cans and boxes down the line, where the bagger works, had it not been for the introduction, more than a century earlier, of an even greater technological masterpiece: the square-bottomed paper bag.

 

The geometry of paper bags continues to hold a magical appeal for those of us who are fascinated by how ordinary things are designed and made. Originally, grocery bags were created on demand by storekeepers, who cut, folded, and pasted sheets of paper, making versatile containers into which purchases could be loaded for carrying home. The first paper bags manufactured commercially are said to have been made in Bristol, England, in the 1840s. In 1852, a “Machine for Making Bags of Paper” was patented in America by Francis Wolle, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. According to Wolle’s own description of the machine’s operation, “pieces of paper of suitable length are given out from a roll of the required width, cut off from the roll and otherwise suitably cut to the required shape, folded, their edges pasted and lapped, and formed into complete and perfect bags.” The “perfect bags” produced at the rate of eighteen hundred per hour by Wolle’s machine were, of course, not perfect, nor was his machine. The history of design has yet to see the development of a perfect object, though it has seen many satisfactory ones and many substantially improved ones. The concept of comparative improvement is embedded in the paradigm for invention, the better mousetrap. No one is ever likely to lay claim to a “best” mousetrap, for that would preclude the inventor himself from coming up with a still better mousetrap without suffering the embarrassment of having previously declared the search complete. As with the mousetrap, so with the bag.

 

Common Core Standards, Appendix B, pg. 98

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

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