Embedded Reading

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Archive for the category “Examples of Embedded Reading in English”

Picture-based Embedded Reading

Thanks to Nathan who shared this on his and Michele’s TPRS blog and gave me permission to share.   His idea for an embedded reading came from a student drawing!  He writes:

Last week as part of introducing some past-tense modal verbs to my German II students (wanted, had to, was able to), I asked them to draw me pictures to illustrate them, and one student turned out this masterpiece:

We spent about five to ten minutes unpacking this picture in class (that’s the Pillsbury Doughboy fighting a chocolate chip cookie dough monster in Mordor), but for the past week, I’ve been trying to figure out a way to get a little more burn for it.

This morning, however, I realized it would make a great embedded story as long as I withheld enough details from the early drafts. As I result I ended up with something like this:

Draft One
The Pillsbury Doughboy wanted to eat chocolate chip cookies, but didn’t have an oven. He was sad, because without an oven he couldn’t bake anything. The Pillsbury Doughboy had to find a new oven and Mr. S. had a big oven. Mr. S. wanted to eat the cookies but couldn’t.

The emphasis in this draft was to try and make the story as normal as possible.  The picture is so over the top, I wanted to build up to the story slowly.  After reading this draft with the class I then had my students draw me a picture of something from this story, with an emphasis on speed over quality (3-5 minutes drawing time).  We then looked at the pictures on the document camera and discussed how well they matched the story.

Draft Two
The Pillsbury Doughboy wanted to eat chocolate chip cookies and made a lot of cookie dough. But the Pillsbury Doughboy didn’t have an oven. He was sad because he couldn’t bake anything without an oven. 

The Pillsbury Doughboy also had another problem: the chocolate chip cookie dough was angry at the Doughboy.  It didn’t want to become cookies. The Doughboy had to fight with the cookie dough AND find an oven.

Mr. S. had a big oven and the Pillsbury Doughboy brought the cookie dough to his house. But Mr. S. was a very bad man.  Mr. S. wanted to kill the Doughboy and eat the cookies, but he couldn’t do anything. He could only watch.

In this draft I started throwing out a few of the funky details such as the cookie dough monster, the fight and the evil Mr. S.  Again I had the students quickly sketch me something from this story, but because this story was longer, I asked them to caption their picture.  Some students gave me a couple words, some wrote out full sentences.  Again we debated how well the pictures matched the story, and sometimes went back and forth between the picture and the story several times to establish the links.

Then I showed them the original picture and said this is what we were working towards.  Comparing notes, we then read the final draft.

Draft Three
The Pillsbury Doughboy wanted to eat chocolate chip cookies, and made a lot of cookie dough. But the Pillsbury Doughboy only had a normal oven and needed a very big oven for his cookie dough. He was sad, because he couldn’t find such a big oven. He had to do something.

The Pillsbury Doughboy also had another problem. There was so much cookie dough that it became a monster. The chocolate chip cookie dough monster was angry at the Doughboy because it didn’t want to become cookies. The Pillsbury Doughboy had to fight with the monster, but the monster was much bigger than he.

Mister Sauron had a big oven and the Pillsbury Doughboy brought the cookie dough to his house. But Mr. Sauron was a very bad man. Mr. Sauron lived in Mordor, and Mt. Doom was his very big oven. Mr. Sauron wanted to kill the Doughboy but he didn’t have any hands. He wanted to eat the cookies but he didn’t have a mouth. Mr. Sauron only had an eye and could only watch. 

What I liked about this approach was the “reveal” that I was working towards.  I had a great over the top picture to end with, and the progressive reveal coupled with additional pictures made it a really fun day.  I teach two sections of German II, and even the class that worked with the original picture had only two people figure out that we were working towards this picture before the finish.

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

Embedded Reading in the Science Classroom

This fall I will be working with our biology teacher and the push-in Special Ed. teacher to incorporate Embedded Reading into the biology curriculum.  I’m extremely excited about this and will add a category for materials and reflections on this collaboration.   Let the science folks in your district know!

 

 

Greetings Embedded Reading: Possible Activities

Here are some possible activities to go along with each level:

Base reading:  Grandma is at the airport.  She is not happy.  A person smiles at her.  She is happy.

* Circle each sentence

*Draw the scene/ find an image online to use or have students each illustrate the scene (allow only 1-2 minutes for drawing)

*Adapt and use this PowerPoint ( Grandma 1 )  to clarify meaning

* Teacher re-reads aloud and students close eyes and visualize the story.

Version 2:  Grandma is at the airport in Los Angeles .  She is not very happy.   She does not smile.  A person smiles at her and says “Hello”.   She is happy.

* Ask ? w/ Question Words: Where is the airport?  Who is in the airport?  Why doesn’t she smile?  Who smiles?  What does that person say?

* Use a template like this that students fill in:  Grandma 2

*  Adapt and use this PowerPoint (Grandma 2 ) to clarify meaning.

Version 3:    One day, Grandma is at the airport in Los Angeles .   She is not very happy.   She does not smile.  A person smiles at her and says “Hello Ma’am “.   She does not respond.   The person is not happy.  A person smiles at her and says, “Good morning, beautiful,” and Grandma smiles.  She is happy.

* Use a version of these questions in conversation, with a game or as a reading activity:  T F Grandma

* Have students write the meaning of the paragraph in English.

Version 4:

One beautiful day, Grandma is at the airport in Los Angeles .  She does not smile.  She does not smile because she is not very happy.     A person smiles at her and says “Hello old woman.”  Grandma does not respond and does not smile.   The person is not happy.  Another person smiles at her and says, “Good morning, Ma’am.”  Grandma does not respond and does not smile. She is not happy and the person is not happy.  Another person smiles at her and says, “Hi  beautiful, ” and Grandma smiles and says “Thank you.”  She is very happy.

* Use a version of these multiple choice questions with the reading:

MC Grandma

*  The teacher acts as a narrator and actors act out the roles and say the lines.

 

Version 5:

One beautiful day in September, Grandma is at the airport in Los Angeles, California.  Usually Grandma smiles.  Today she does not smile.  She does not smile because she is not very happy.   She is not happy because she is in the airport for two days.   She is very tired.

A boy smiles at her and says “Hello old woman.”  Grandma is tired.  She does not respond and does not smile.   The boy is not happy.

A man smiles at her and says, “Good morning, Ma’am.”  Grandma does not respond and does not smile.  She is too tired.   She is not happy and the man is not happy.

Ryan Seacrest arrives from London.   He smiles at her and says, “Hi  beautiful, ” and Grandma smiles.  She says, “Hello!  How are you handsome?”   Ryan responds, “I’m very good thank you.   How are you, gorgeous? ”  Grandma says, ” I am very, very, very good, thank you!”  She is very happy.

* Use a version of this PowerPoint: Grandma 5

* Create additional T/F or MC questions for the longer reading.

* Have students work in groups and write a Version 6.

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

Second Language Classes : Greetings in an Embedded Reading (Example in English)

Below is a simple embedded reading using vocabulary that is common to many classrooms in the first weeks of school.  It could be used with true beginners or emerging readers.

Base reading:

Grandma is at the airport.  She is not happy.  A person smiles at her.  She is happy.

Version 2:

Grandma is at the airport in Los Angeles .  She is not very happy.   She does not smile.  A person smiles at her and says “Hello”.   She is happy.

Version 3:

One day, Grandma is at the airport in Los Angeles .   She is not very happy.   She does not smile.  A person smiles at her and says “Hello Ma’am “.   She does not respond.   The person is not happy.  A person smiles at her and says, “Good morning, beautiful, ” and Grandma smiles.  She is happy.

Version 4:

One beautiful day, Grandma is at the airport in Los Angeles .  She does not smile.  She does not smile because she is not very happy.     A person smiles at her and says “Hello old woman.”  Grandma does not respond and does not smile.   The person is not happy.  Another person smiles at her and says, “Good morning, Ma’am.”  Grandma does not respond and does not smile. She is not happy and the person is not happy.  Another person smiles at her and says, “Hi  beautiful, ” and Grandma smiles and says “Thank you.”  She is very happy.

Version 5:

One beautiful day in September, Grandma is at the airport in Los Angeles, California.  Usually Grandma smiles.  Today she does not smile.  She does not smile because she is not very happy.   She is not happy because she is in the airport for two days.   She is very tired.

A boy smiles at her and says “Hello old woman.”  Grandma is tired.  She does not respond and does not smile.   The boy is not happy.

A man smiles at her and says, “Good morning, Ma’am.”  Grandma does not respond and does not smile.  She is too tired.   She is not happy and the man is not happy.

Ryan Seacrest arrives from London.   He smiles at her and says, “Hi  beautiful, ” and Grandma smiles.  She says, “Hello!  How are you handsome?”   Ryan responds, “I’m very good thank you.   How are you, gorgeous? ”  Grandma says, ” I am very, very, very good, thank you!”  She is very happy.

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

The Family Looked For The Dog

The family looked for the dog

Another good example of Bottom Up Embedded Reading creation.  In English, with a clear outline of how the versions were created.

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

The Boy Opened the Door

An introduction to a short story using ER.  In English but a good example of how a reading is constructed from the Bottom Up!!The boy opened the door

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

Example in English..helpful for content-area support

This is an example of an Embedded Reading that I created last year for a science teacher who had students who struggled with reading.  It may be helpful for those of you who work with ESL students in content-area support.

 

What is a Veterinary Behaviorist?

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

Michael P Readings …More advanced

Please remember that this, and other pieces posted here, are written and shared by busy human beings.  It is practically guaranteed that you will find errors, or other ways that you would prefer to say something.  Be kind.  Change what you need to for your own students.   {Please do not distribute via outside of the classroom or for your own profit without explicit permission(

Michael P (2)

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

Michael Phelps Reading: Lower Level English and Spanish

Here is an embedded reading about Michael Phelps.   It is written completely in the present tense.  There is a version in English and in Spanish.  I hope that others will add on in other languages.  I’ll write a present/past tense version and post it later.  (I try to use the tenses in a “natural” way but many programs stay in the present tense in the early levels to align themselves with other teachers in the district, hence the version here.)

Miguel vive en

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

From The Bottom Up..Creating an Embedded Reading

This PowerPoint demonstrates how to create an Embedded Reading from a base story, with an example in English.  Feel free to use this with your colleagues!!  We want others to know about, and know how to create, Embedded Readings!  However, please do not use for profit.  (see below)

 

Bottom Up Creating Embedded Readings

 

All content of this website © Embedded Reading 2012-2014 or original authors.  Unauthorized use or distribution of materials without express and written consent of the owners/authors is strictly prohibited.   Examples and  links may be used as long as clear and direct reference to the site and original authors is clearly established.

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